UCLA TIES for Families

Faculty Sponsor: 
Langley, Audra
Department: 
Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
Contact Name: 
Joe Guzman, B.A.
Phone: 
310-794-0117
Description of Research Project: 
TIES for Families is an interdisciplinary, university-based program established in 1995 to promote the successful adoption, growth, and development of children with special needs, especially those with prenatal substance exposure who are in foster care. Research assistants will focus on several research projects: 1) UCLA TIES for Families Treatment Outcomes Project: Project testing the efficacy of UCLA TIES for Families intervention services available to children and families, including adoption counseling for new families in transition, individual and family therapy, home-visiting, psychological testing, monthly parental and child support groups, short-term weekly therapy groups for children and teens, parenting skills training, infant mental health, and new parent peer mentoring. 2) ADAPT Research Project: Project testing the efficacy of a manualized psychotherapy intervention aimed at improving outcomes for children adopted from foster care, ages 5-14. 3) UCLA TIES for Adoption Evaluation Qualitative Study: Project investigating the long-term outcomes of children adopted from foster care through qualitative interviews of young adults adopted as children.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Research assistants will help with data organization, data entry, data collection, and interview coding. Research assistants will also be asked to perform basic administrative tasks such as filing, photocopying, and maintaining databases. No prior research experience is necessary, just a willingness to learn. Requirements: at least a 2-Quarter commitment, attention to detail, independent work skills, and timeliness.

Knowledge Exchange on Evidence-Based Practice Sustainment (4KEEPS) and Translating Evidence-Based Interventions for ASD: A Multi-Level Implementation Strategy (TEAMS) Projects

Faculty Sponsor: 
Lau, Anna
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Christopher Gomez
Room Number: 
A292
Phone: 
310-825-9250
Description of Research Project: 
Description of 4KEEPS: 4KEEPS stands for Knowledge Exchange on Evidence-Based Practice Sustainment. This is a two-site (UCLA and UCSD) NIMH-funded project focused on community therapists implementation of multiple evidence-based practices for children’s mental health within a system-driven reform in Los Angeles County. The aims of the new study are to develop a pragmatic quality assessment tool to assess therapist delivery of EBP strategies associated with positive client outcomes. This study is conducted by Drs. Lauren Brookman-Frazee and Anna Lau. Description of TEAMS: TEAMS stands for Translating Evidence-Based Interventions for ASD: A Multi-Level Implementation Strategy. This is a set of two coordinated NIMH-funded studies that will test ways to support community providers in their learning and delivery of treatments for ASD. TEAMS is being carried out in three sites (UCLA, UC Davis, and UCSD).
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
We anticipate that undergraduates and volunteers will be filling a number of different roles on our team for both projects. Research assistants will have the opportunity to shadow and observe recruitment- and intervention-related workshops in the Los Angeles County. Other tasks include data extraction and entry, preparing study materials, and literature searches. RAs will be provided with graduate school workshops and resources, professional development (e.g., CV workshop, SPSS tutorial), and interactive seminars to develop critical and analytical thinking skills. Interested applicants should email the following documents to Christopher Gomez, research coordinator, at cgomez@psych.ucla.edu: brief cover letter stating your goals/interests in psychology, resume/CV, and an academic transcript (can be unofficial).

Visual Object Recognition

Faculty Sponsor: 
Liu, Zili
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Dr. Zili Liu
Room Number: 
Franz 7619
Phone: 
310-267-4683
Description of Research Project: 
This National Science Foundation sponsored research investigates how the brain encodes into memory visually perceived scenes and objects (e.g., faces). Counter-intuitive predictions, with promising pilot data, will be tested.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Responsibilities include scheduling experiments on experimentrix, conducting the experiments, and debriefing the participant after each experiment.

Cognitive, EEG and genetic biomarkers in child psychiatric disorders

Faculty Sponsor: 
Loo, Sandra
Department: 
Psychiatry
Contact Name: 
Patricia Tan
Room Number: 
Semel Institute A7-456
Description of Research Project: 
Dr. Sandra Loo is an associate professor-in-residence in the Division of Child Psychiatry and the Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics. Dr. Loo's lab is studying cognitive and electrophysiological (EEG) measures as biomarkers of diagnosis, developmental trajectory and treatment response in child psychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Tourette's Syndrome, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), anxiety disorders and mood dysregulation. In addition, the Loo lab studies the genetics of EEG measurements in ADHD. The goal of this work is to define EEG correlates of cognitive and behavioral functioning and use these as 'refined phenotypes' to identify risk genes for psychiatric disorder. The long-term goal of this research is to better understand the neural mechanisms by which genetic polymorphisms produce the cognitive and behavioral phenotypes evident in childhood psychiatric disorders.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students would assist in data entry, subject recruitment and recording, and data analyses, depending on skill level. Opportunities for developing and implementing appropriately sized research projects are available and encouraged.

A Computational Investigation of Threatening Actions

Faculty Sponsor: 
Lu, Hongjing
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Akila Kadambi
Room Number: 
Franze 3435
Description of Research Project: 
The present study aims to unveil the computational mechanisms that the human visual and reasoning system employ to perceive threatening actions. We will investigate both the contribution of bottom-up, kinematic information in the perception of threatening actions and the contribution of top-down, contextual information to support complex understanding and reasoning of threatening actions. We will focus on how people interpret actions in novel situations, using both laboratory and real-life stimuli.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students will assist in stimuli collection and be familiar with YouTube. Students who have programming ability (e.g., MATLAB, Python, etc) will be preferred. An ability to work during the summer is also preferred. Students will also be involved with data collection and materials preparation. Prior research experience is not necessary, but a strong enthusiasm for research is. 10 hour/week minimum commitment. If interested, please email Akila Kadambi (akadambi@ucla.edu) with your resume/CV and an unofficial transcript. Looking forward to hearing from you!

QRClab: Open Science Practices

Faculty Sponsor: 
Montoya, Amanda
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Amanda Montoya
Room Number: 
LSB 5324
Phone: 
310-794-5069
Description of Research Project: 
AUTUMN 2019 PROJECT: The lab is currently working on a project related to Open Science practices in Psychology. A new type of research publication has become available over the last few years: Registered Reports. For these papers researchers submit their Introduction, Methods, and Data Analysis plan to a journal before collecting data. Reviewers provide feedback for the proposed study, and if accepted the manuscript will be accepted regardless of the results of the study. In this project we are reviewing different journal’s policies on this new type of publication to provide clearer information to psychologists about the expectations when submitting this new type of publication.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Research assistants will help with tasks to help examine how specific statistical methods are being used in psychology and other social science fields. Expansion of the research assistant’s tasks will be based on both commitment and interest. There may be opportunities to analyze data, ask your own research question, and/or assist with computer programming tasks. Because of the training involved, we prefer candidates who can commit to working in the lab for at least three quarters. You can read more about the current research projects on the lab webpage: akmontoya.com/QRCLab Day to day tasks will involve coding journal policy pages, working with data in Excel, literature searches, and reading/editing manuscript drafts. Students often come to the lab from a wide range of backgrounds, but the most important qualifications are an eagerness to learn, interest in quantitative psychology, and confidence in your analytical and mathematical skills.

Study of antipsychotic medication adherence in schizophrenia

Faculty Sponsor: 
Nuechterlein, Keith
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Kenneth Subotnik, Ph.D.
Room Number: 
300 Medical Plaza, Room 2240
Phone: 
(310) 825-0334
Description of Research Project: 
The UCLA Aftercare Research Program has been on the UCLA campus for over two decades, and provides free psychiatric treatment for patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia who participate in the research study. Our longitudinal research program examines whether we can accentuate our efforts to get first break patients back to work to prevent the onset of chronic disability.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
For this SRP position, the student will help to maintain our extensive database on medication adherence among our schizophrenia patients. In addition the student will assist in the review of the literature on medication adherence in schizophrenia and summarize articles related to medication adherence. Students with an interest in schizophrenia and psychopathology research are encouraged to apply. This position is particularly appropriate for undergraduates with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5. Second year students are especially encouraged to apply, but all years will be considered. Must be extremely reliable and dependable (excessive tardiness and absences are NOT acceptable). Must be able to balance competing demands and must be competent in multitasking and adapting to fluctuating priorities. Candidate must be detail-oriented, organized, accurate, and efficient with minimal supervision. Candidate must have excellent oral and written English communications skills. Ability to understand issues of patient confidentiality and safety is required. Proficiency in the use of standard PC office equipment and standard PC software (i.e. MS Office, Word, Excel, Internet searching) is also required. Must have excellent interpersonal skills and demonstrate appropriate interpersonal boundaries with patients and staff and be able to work in a shared workspace with a diverse team of mental health professionals. Some experience in library literature reviews, use of pubmed on UCLA library website, some experience in reading and summarizing psychology research articles. Experience in the use of SPSS is preferred. Sophomore applicants preferred so that they can potentially stay for multiple years. Documents to Submit: Resume, Cover Letter, Unofficial Transcript, Writing Sample Send materials to: ksubotnik@mednet.ucla.edu Document Submission notes: Please name each file with the following format (in the following example, the applicant’s name is “Jane Doe”, The content is “Resume”, and date (e.g., Jane Doe Resume 9-1-2017). Other documents should use a similar file naming format. Writing sample can be a term paper for college level class, preferably one with a literature review included.

Study of social cognition and attention in schizophrenia patients: Data tracking and entry

Faculty Sponsor: 
Nuechterlein, Keith
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Kenneth Subotnik
Room Number: 
300 UCLA Medical Plaza, Room 2240
Phone: 
(310) 825-0334
Description of Research Project: 
The UCLA Aftercare Research Program has been on the UCLA campus for over two decades, and provides free psychiatric treatment for patients with a recent onset of schizophrenia who participate in the research study. Our longitudinal research program examines whether we can accentuate our efforts to get first break patients back to work to prevent the onset of chronic disability.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
The student will assist the Aftercare Research Program staff with general research/project tasks including: data file management, data entry and data collection, tracking and triggering research measures, and updating the data entry site. Other tasks can include filing, photocopying, faxing, and maintaining an off-site data storage inventory, and assisting the patient coordinator with patient file maintenance and errands. Students with an interest in schizophrenia and psychopathology research are encouraged to apply. This position is particularly appropriate for undergraduates with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5. Second or third year students are especially encouraged to apply, but all years will be considered. Must be extremely reliable and dependable (excessive tardiness and absences are NOT acceptable). Must be able to balance competing demands and must be competent in multitasking and adapting to fluctuating priorities. Candidate must be detail-oriented, organized, accurate, and efficient with minimal supervision. Candidate must have excellent oral and written English communications skills. Ability to understand issues of patient confidentiality and safety is required. Proficiency in the use of standard PC office equipment and standard PC software (i.e. MS Office, Word, Excel, Internet searching) is also required. Must have excellent interpersonal skills and demonstrate appropriate interpersonal boundaries with patients and staff and be able to work in a shared workspace with a diverse team of mental health professionals.

Social Perception and the Brain

Faculty Sponsor: 
Parkinson, Carolyn
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Ryan Hyon
Room Number: 
3319 Franz Hall
Description of Research Project: 
Our social neuroscience lab studies how the human brain represents and navigates the social world. This research combines approaches from cognitive neuroscience, social network analysis, and social psychology to address questions like: How do our brains track and encode information about the structure of our social networks? How are our thoughts and actions influenced by the social networks we inhabit? How does the brain encode different kinds of distance from the self (e.g., distance in time, space, and social ties), and how does the encoding of this information interact with other mental processes? To address these and other questions, we use a combination of behavioral experimentation, social network analysis, and neuroimaging techniques.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
We are seeking enthusiastic, organized and independent students interested in getting first-hand exposure to research. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in multiple aspects of the research process, with the scope of each student’s responsibility increasing over time. Possible responsibilities include corresponding with and running participants, basic experimental design, generating experimental stimuli, developing and implementing participant recruitment strategies, literature reviews, data entry, coding data, and participating in lab group discussions. Excellent, exceptionally motivated students may also have the opportunity to get involved with fMRI research and data analysis. Students are asked to commit a minimum of 2 quarters. Interested students should email Ryan Hyon at rhyon@psych.ucla.edu with your CV/resume, unofficial academic transcript and a brief statement summarizing your research interests and academic goals.

UCLA Child, OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program

Faculty Sponsor: 
Peris, Tara
Department: 
Psychiatry
Contact Name: 
Tara Peris
Description of Research Project: 
Are you interested in kids and families? Would you like to learn more about how anxiety and depression affect the body at a biological level? There are several 196 opportunities available in the UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program for students with these interests. These are great training experiences for anyone interested in biological aspects of youth mental health. Currently, we have multiple studies that measure stress responding in children and adolescents (and sometimes their parents). Research assistants will be involved in data collection from kids and families and in monitoring and processing data. An interest in working with families and learning about methods for collecting and analyzing psychophysiological data is a must.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Your primary responsibilities include assisting with the processing of electrocardiographic and electrodermal data, data collection procedures, calling participants, answering questions, data entry, administrative support, and attendance at weekly supervision meetings. This is a great opportunity to gain research experience for graduate school and learning about clinical research. Please note you will not be involved in patient care.

Child and Adolescent Emotions: Effects of family, attention, and sleep on youth’s ability to manage stress and anxiety

Faculty Sponsor: 
Piacentini, John
Department: 
Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
Contact Name: 
Holly Truong
Description of Research Project: 
We are interested in understanding why certain children and adolescents struggle to manage stress and other types of negative emotions, specifically anxiety. Factors like parenting, the types of information to which youth attend or disengage, and youth’s sleep quality can influence how well children and adolescents regulate emotion. These studies investigate youth’s cognitive and brain function, behavior, and subjective experience in relation to anxiety. In particular, the studies are interested in identifying biological and behavioral markers of risk that can be translated into better, earlier identification and treatment tools for pediatric anxiety disorders. The methods used include EEG/ERP, behavior observation, cognitive or neuro-psychological testing, and experience sampling of behavior and mood. Prior experience working with children and adolescents is desirable, though not essential. Training will be provided. This is an excellent opportunity for students interested in applying to graduate programs in clinical psychology or medical schools.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students will have the opportunity to learn and gain experience in research involving children and adolescents, some of whom are diagnosed with anxiety and/or related disorders. Students will assist in preparation of study materials, helping run child participants through study procedures including computer and EEG testing, assessments of sleep quality, and experience sampling methods (used to capture “real-world” emotional experiences) as well as data entry/coding/analysis. We require a 3-quarter commitment of 8 hours per week minimum and a minimum GPA of 3.4.

Underlying Processes of OCD in Children and Parents

Faculty Sponsor: 
Piacentini, Ph.D., ABPP, John
Department: 
Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences
Contact Name: 
Monica Wu, Ph.D.
Phone: 
310-206-8120
Description of Research Project: 
This study seeks to identify and examine underlying processes of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We will be recruiting families (children and parents) to come in for a single visit and complete a battery of clinician interviews, self-report measures, neurocognitive tests, and collect psychophysiological data. The purpose of this study to investigate whether there are certain abnormalities or deficits in cognition passed down from parents to children, potentially contributing to the development and/or maintenance of OCD symptoms. Research assistant involvement in this study is ideal for individuals interested in the neurocognitive, physiological, and clinical aspects of childhood OCD.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students will be expected to assist with the collection of psychophysiological data (electrodermal activity, heart rate, respiration). Depending on experience and interest, individuals may have the unique opportunity to administer a select number of the neurocognitive tasks. Students will also be involved with various clerical aspects of research (e.g., study packet making, data entry). Research assistants will also be provided the opportunity to be involved in other research projects in the UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program. Close guidance on professional development and academic preparation will be provided for interested individuals. This position provides a unique opportunity for face-to-face contact with families within the context of a research study and great experience for those interested in pursuing medical/graduate school. Please note that applicants should be able to commit to at least 7 hours/week and a full academic year (Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters) for this position, given the extensive training needed. Interested individuals should e-mail Monica Wu, Ph.D. at MSWu@mednet.ucla.edu with their CV/resume and a cover letter.

Examination of the Short- and Long-term Impact of School Shootings

Faculty Sponsor: 
Pynoos, Robert
Department: 
Psychiatry
Contact Name: 
Melissa Brymer
Room Number: 
on and off-campus locations
Phone: 
310 235-2633 x227
Description of Research Project: 
This project is a collaborative study to investigate the consequences of, and response to, six deadly school shootings and six community mass violence events that have occurred in the U.S. within the past five years. The project will employ a mixed method design and a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach by creating a partnership with each of the 12 communities to ensure that these communities capture lessons learned from the tragedy that they experienced, learn from other communities that have experienced a similar event, and use the findings from this study to further promote their ongoing adjustment and recovery. By examining multiple school shootings and mass violence events, this project will identify current gaps in services and policies, refine recovery protocols in school/community emergency plans, foster collaboration between different responding organizations and agencies, and ensure that funding streams are available during critical phases of recovery.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students will gain knowledge about child trauma and the impact of mass violence on communities. Responsibilities include conducting literature reviews, reviewing media and social media content, coordinating study interviews, transcribing interviews, preparing data for data entry, and preparing and contributing to study manuscripts. This project is in partnership with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress and the UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters. Students can participate in trainings on child trauma and will receive weekly supervision. Multiple quarter commitment is encouraged but not required. There are two lab locations – one in the Public Health building and one is off-campus. We will work with the student to determine which lab location works best.

Stigma, Prejudice, and Intergroup Relations

Faculty Sponsor: 
Shapiro, Jenessa
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Shapiro, Jenessa
Description of Research Project: 
Why are interactions with members of different groups sometimes awkward? What strategies do frequent and infrequent targets of prejudice employ to manage their self-presentation and to facilitate smoother intergroup interactions? How do concerns about negative stereotypes influence what we do and how we perform on stereotyped tasks? How do specific, tangible threats perceived to be posed by different stigmatized groups differentially bias people's attention, memory, and judgments? In our SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY LAB we are interested in answering these questions and more. We conduct a number of research studies over the semester, all aimed at understanding stigma, prejudice, and discrimination.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Our SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY LAB is looking for motivated, curious, and enthusiastic research assistants. Research Assistants will learn firsthand about research and gain valuable experience for graduate school and the job market. You will participate in all aspects of the research process including assisting with the design of stimuli, recruiting and working with participants, collecting data, exploring the research literature, and participating in lab group discussions--all while learning about prejudice, stigma, stereotyping, and discrimination. **Research Assistants needed for Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters only**

Social Skills Training for Children

Faculty Sponsor: 
Shilpa, Baweja
Department: 
Child Psychiatry
Contact Name: 
Shilpa, Baweja
Room Number: 
Semel Institute
Phone: 
310-825-0142
Description of Research Project: 
Our project seeks to assess effectiveness of parent assisted social skills training with children (ages 7-12) who have established deficits in making and/or keeping friends (including children with Autism Spectrum Disorders or ADHD). Each week we instruct them on important elements of socialization (i.e., conversational skills; peer entry and exiting strategies; handling teasing, bullying, and rejection; changing bad reputations; choosing peers wisely; handling arguments and disagreements; and having appropriate get-togethers with peers). Separate parent and child sessions are conducted concurrently for each week. Parents are taught how to assist their children in making and keeping friends by providing performance feedback through coaching during weekly in vivo socialization homework assignments. Kids are taught important social skills through didactic instruction, role-plays, and behavioral rehearsal during real play activities.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
The RA is needed to assist with our social skills interventions on Wednesday evenings. Research assistants will assist with preparing materials for intervention, conducting research fidelity during the group, assisting with behavior management, and providing performance feedback to children and teens through coaching during real play activities. In addition during the week the RA will assist with completing initial intake assessments with families--including helping administer/score assessments and keeping an up-to-date research database. We require a 2 quarter commitment. Must be available a couple of afternoons during the week as well as Wednesdays 5:15pm-8:15pm.

Linguistic Analysis of Emotional Disclosure in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Faculty Sponsor: 
Stanton, Annette
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Brittany Drake
Phone: 
5173166233
Description of Research Project: 
Join Dr. Annette Stanton’s lab as a Research Assistant and work on a study investigating emotion expression, psychological distancing, and coping among women with metastatic breast cancer.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
RA Responsibilities and Opportunities: • Learn about coping, psychological distancing, emotion regulation, and health • Assist with the development of a content coding scheme • Code qualitative data • Get mentorship from graduate students in clinical and health psychology—helpful for graduate school prep! • Opportunity to attend Dr. Stanton’s weekly lab meetings • Students who excel may have the opportunity to develop an independent project

Topics in Coping and Well-being

Faculty Sponsor: 
Stanton, Annette
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Jacqueline Kim
Description of Research Project: 
This assistantship involves examining various topics in coping, mental health, and physical health, particularly of those experiencing chronic adversity. Some of the focus is cross-cultural and aimed at better understanding the influence of collectivist cultural backgrounds (esp. Asian-heritage). Outcomes of interest include self-reported internalizing and somatic symptoms. Topics the research assistant may be assigned to work on include: • Culturally-relevant supportive care needs in cancer • Symptom experience and mental health/health service use • Use of approach- and avoidance-oriented coping strategies and internalizing symptoms • Prospective associations between internalizing and somatic symptoms • Coping via writing and its relationship to well-being.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students’ primary responsibilities will be to: conduct literature reviews and create written summaries and engage in discussions about study design. Data management tasks will be given as needed. Topic assignments will depend on research needs, tailoring to student interest when possible. Depending on prior statistical background and project need, students may assist with data analyses. Given data availability and student initiative, students will be encouraged to work on research conference proposals. *Qualifications of Student: Some familiarity with literature reviews and able to critically analyze academic journal articles. Student must be detail-oriented, conscientious, accountable, and communicate clearly in a timely fashion. It will be helpful to know if the student has experience using Zotero/Mendeley, Qualtrics, or statistical software but this is not a requirement. It will also be helpful to know if the student is fluent (reading, writing, speaking) in an Asian language or Spanish. *Time Commitment Requested: Minimum 2 quarters, but longer commitment preferred (can continue as a volunteer after 1 quarter). 6-10 hours/week, including supervision/meetings as needed. *Dates of Project: Present - Summer 2018.

Anxiety and Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Faculty Sponsor: 
Taylor, Kate
Department: 
Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
Contact Name: 
Kate Taylor
Room Number: 
Integrated Substance Abuse Programs
Phone: 
310-267-5339
Description of Research Project: 
There are two research projects being conducted concurrently that are recruiting undergraduate psychology students to get 196A credit. The first is a randomized clinical trial comparing standard treatment for substance use disorders at a community addictions treatment clinic to a new treatment that integrates cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorder. Individuals with social anxiety and alcohol use disorders are being recruited for participation. This study includes self-report and behavioral outcomes. The second study is a randomized clinical trial comparing standard substance use disorder cognitive behavioral therapy to a new behavioral intervention targeting maladaptive responding to negative affect among young adults with cannabis use disorder. Participants aged 18-25 with cannabis use disorder, elevated negative affect, and difficulty managing their negative affect will be recruited. This study includes self-report, behavioral, objective, and fMRI outcomes.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Psychology students will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience with real-world clinical trials. Students will be responsible for assisting with behavioral/laboratory tasks, coordinating, tracking, and scheduling participants, managing audio and video recordings of therapy and assessment sessions, data entry, and administrative/clerical responsibilities. Students will have the opportunity to shadow research staff during assessments and group therapy.

Stress Eating, Weight Stigma, Rewarding Behaviors, and Health

Faculty Sponsor: 
Tomiyama, A. Janet
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Alyssa Choi
Description of Research Project: 
The DiSH Lab is actively recruiting research assistants for various studies investigating stress eating, weight stigma, or rewarding behaviors, and their effects on health. For more information about our lab and to apply, please visit www.dishlab.org.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Research assistants contribute to all stages of the research process and gain valuable research experience, especially as we are currently beginning several new studies. It is NOT necessary to be a Psychology major. It IS required to commit to at least 8 hours per week. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.4 OR have earned an A in Psych 150. We cannot consider your application until you know your schedule for the quarter for which you are applying. If you are interested in joining, and know your schedule for Summer Session A, Session C, and/or Fall 2017, please email your application to dishlab@psych.ucla.edu. Applications can be found on the "Opportunities" page of our website.

Pages