Examination of the Short- and Long-term Impact of School Shootings

Faculty Sponsor: 
Pynoos, Robert
Department: 
Psychiatry
Contact Name: 
Melissa Brymer
Room Number: 
on and off-campus locations
Phone: 
310 235-2633 x227
Description of Research Project: 
This project is a collaborative study to investigate the consequences of, and response to, six deadly school shootings and six community mass violence events that have occurred in the U.S. within the past five years. The project will employ a mixed method design and a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach by creating a partnership with each of the 12 communities to ensure that these communities capture lessons learned from the tragedy that they experienced, learn from other communities that have experienced a similar event, and use the findings from this study to further promote their ongoing adjustment and recovery. By examining multiple school shootings and mass violence events, this project will identify current gaps in services and policies, refine recovery protocols in school/community emergency plans, foster collaboration between different responding organizations and agencies, and ensure that funding streams are available during critical phases of recovery.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students will gain knowledge about child trauma and the impact of mass violence on communities. Responsibilities include conducting literature reviews, reviewing media and social media content, coordinating study interviews, transcribing interviews, preparing data for data entry, and preparing and contributing to study manuscripts. This project is in partnership with the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress and the UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters. Students can participate in trainings on child trauma and will receive weekly supervision. Multiple quarter commitment is encouraged but not required. There are two lab locations – one in the Public Health building and one is off-campus. We will work with the student to determine which lab location works best.

The role of emotion, and self-regulation, on learning

Faculty Sponsor: 
Sandoval, William
Department: 
Education, & Psychology
Contact Name: 
Dr. Anahid Modrek
Room Number: 
3135 Moore Hall
Description of Research Project: 
It has been proposed that better learners demonstrate higher levels of self-regulation. There exists a growing literature on self-regulation, and self-regulation can be hypothesized to play a potentially critical role in learning, given that students must monitor and manage both the learning goal and their own learning strategies. Recent research goes beyond self-regulation as a global construct to distinguish distinct components of self-regulation, with a major division being between cognitive regulation, behavior regulation, and emotion regulation. While cognitive regulation, not behavior regulation, has been found to be the more effective predictor of learning, much less explored is the role of emotion regulation on learning skill. Can individual differences in emotion explain how, and why, people learn more effectively? The primary goal of this research is to better understand the roles of different self-regulatory processes, specifically within educational contexts, through the investigation of emotion regulation and cognition regulation on learning.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Research assistants will be expected to help with data entry/coding, read empirical articles, as well as attend lab meetings. If desired, research assistants may get involved in their own unique research project, which is a great experience for those potentially interested in graduate school. This position is highly desirable for those looking to go onto research careers or applying for a PhD.

Political Polarization

Faculty Sponsor: 
Sears, David
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Lauren Goldstein
Room Number: 
5445A
Phone: 
6175042288
Description of Research Project: 
This project explores political polarization between Republicans and Democrats, a problem that has been gaining attention in the research literature in both psychology and political science. How do ideological beliefs influence polarization? What about emotions? Are both sides of the aisle equally responsible for polarization? These are some of the questions our research explores.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
We are looking for two undergraduate RAs, who will get hands-on experience in all areas of the research process. They will code data, assist in literature reviews, and complete some of study programming for future studies. RAs will be invited to attend the weekly political psychology lab meeting, in order to gain more familiarity with our methods and the areas of study that our political psychology students are working on, and will have the opportunity to assist in the presentation of this work.

Stigma, Prejudice, and Intergroup Relations

Faculty Sponsor: 
Shapiro, Jenessa
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Shapiro, Jenessa
Description of Research Project: 
Why are interactions with members of different groups sometimes awkward? What strategies do frequent and infrequent targets of prejudice employ to manage their self-presentation and to facilitate smoother intergroup interactions? How do concerns about negative stereotypes influence what we do and how we perform on stereotyped tasks? How do specific, tangible threats perceived to be posed by different stigmatized groups differentially bias people's attention, memory, and judgments? In our SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY LAB we are interested in answering these questions and more. We conduct a number of research studies over the semester, all aimed at understanding stigma, prejudice, and discrimination.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Our SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY LAB is looking for motivated, curious, and enthusiastic research assistants. Research Assistants will learn firsthand about research and gain valuable experience for graduate school and the job market. You will participate in all aspects of the research process including assisting with the design of stimuli, recruiting and working with participants, collecting data, exploring the research literature, and participating in lab group discussions--all while learning about prejudice, stigma, stereotyping, and discrimination. **Research Assistants needed for Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters only**

Topics in Coping and Well-being

Faculty Sponsor: 
Stanton, Annette
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Jacqueline Kim
Description of Research Project: 
This project examines various topics in coping and mental/physical health of those experiencing chronic adversity. Some of this project’s focus is cross-cultural and aimed at better understanding the role of Asian/Asian American cultural backgrounds. Particular outcomes of interest include self-reported internalizing and somatic symptoms. Topics the research assistant may be assigned to work on include: • Mixed use of approach and avoidant coping strategies in chronic adversity • Coping with internalizing and somatic symptoms in cancer • Cultural differences in the relationship between internalizing and somatic symptoms • Emotionally expressive coping via writing interventions and its impact on well-being Time Commitment Requested: Minimum 2 quarters, longer commitment preferred.  6-10 hours/week, including supervision/meetings as needed. Dates of Project: Present - Spring/Summer 2018 Qualifications of Student: A qualified student should have some familiarity with literature reviews and be able to critically analyze academic journal articles.  Student should also know how to use Excel, Word, Google docs.  Student must be detail-oriented, conscientious, accountable, and be able to communicate clearly in a timely fashion.  It will be helpful to know if the student has experience using Zotero/Mendeley, Qualtrics, or statistical analysis software but this is not a requirement. _X__ Credit Offered ___ Money Offered _X__Experience only ___ Work Study
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Students’ primary responsibilities will be to: (1) conduct necessary literature reviews and create written summaries, and (2) assist with data collection preparation using Qualtrics. Project progress may also call for assistance with data management or IRB revisions. Topic assignments will be dependent on project needs, tailoring to student interest when possible. Depending on prior statistical background and project need, students may be asked to assist with data analyses. Given data availability and student initiative, students will be encouraged to work on research conference proposals.

Interpersonal Coping Study

Faculty Sponsor: 
Stanton, Annette
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Emma Bright
Description of Research Project: 
Our lab focuses on identifying psychological and social factors that promote adjustment to health-related adversity. Through our research we seek to answer questions like: What is the effect of specific coping strategies for adjustment to stressors (e.g., cancer diagnosis, relational conflict)? What are the mechanisms through which coping strategies promote or hinder adjustment? In the present study, we are interested in examining how interpersonal coping strategies (i.e., coping strategies that involve social relationships) may promote adjustment to stressful situations, in particular cancer and relational conflict.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
We are seeking enthusiastic, reliable, detail-oriented students interested in gaining experience in health psychology research. Research assistants will have the opportunity to participate in various aspects of the research including: completing literature reviews, participating in recruitment efforts, corresponding with and running participants, data entry, and participating in lab meeting discussions. Exceptional students will also have the opportunity to develop research projects of their own within the framework of the current study. We are looking for students able to begin Fall 2017 and commit for at least three quarters with preference given to students who are in their second or third year. If you would like to join our research team please email a CV/resume and your anticipated availability to Emma Bright (ebright@ucla.edu).

Anxiety and Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Faculty Sponsor: 
Taylor, Kate
Department: 
Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences
Contact Name: 
Kate Taylor
Room Number: 
Integrated Substance Abuse Programs
Phone: 
310-267-5339
Description of Research Project: 
There are two research projects being conducted concurrently that are recruiting undergraduate psychology students to get 196A credit. The first is a randomized clinical trial comparing standard treatment for substance use disorders at a community addictions treatment clinic to a new treatment that integrates cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder and alcohol use disorder. Individuals with social anxiety and alcohol use disorders are being recruited for participation. This study includes self-report and behavioral outcomes. The second study is a randomized clinical trial comparing standard substance use disorder cognitive behavioral therapy to a new behavioral intervention targeting maladaptive responding to negative affect among young adults with cannabis use disorder. Participants aged 18-25 with cannabis use disorder, elevated negative affect, and difficulty managing their negative affect will be recruited. This study includes self-report, behavioral, objective, and fMRI outcomes.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Psychology students will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience with real-world clinical trials. Students will be responsible for assisting with behavioral/laboratory tasks, coordinating, tracking, and scheduling participants, managing audio and video recordings of therapy and assessment sessions, data entry, and administrative/clerical responsibilities. Students will have the opportunity to shadow research staff during assessments and group therapy.

Stress Eating, Weight Stigma, Rewarding Behaviors, and Health

Faculty Sponsor: 
Tomiyama, A. Janet
Department: 
Psychology
Contact Name: 
Alyssa Choi
Description of Research Project: 
The DiSH Lab is actively recruiting research assistants for various studies investigating stress eating, weight stigma, or rewarding behaviors, and their effects on health. For more information about our lab and to apply, please visit www.dishlab.org.
Description of Student Responsibilities: 
Research assistants contribute to all stages of the research process and gain valuable research experience, especially as we are currently beginning several new studies. It is NOT necessary to be a Psychology major. It IS required to commit to at least 8 hours per week. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.4 OR have earned an A in Psych 150. We cannot consider your application until you know your schedule for the quarter for which you are applying. If you are interested in joining, and know your schedule for Summer Session A, Session C, and/or Fall 2017, please email your application to dishlab@psych.ucla.edu. Applications can be found on the "Opportunities" page of our website.

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